Wenatchee Continues a Good Idea on Mental Health ResponseNew Director of The

first_imgThe City of Wenatchee has signed a grant agreement with the Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs to continue to fund a Mental Health Field Response Team.Wenatchee Police Captain Edgar Reinfeld stated the grant money means more coverage and less time officers have to spend on mental health situations. Normally an officer must wait for a designated crisis responder, or DCR, to evaluate someone’s mental health before the officer can move on to the next call. October presented a good example of the extra help a mental health field response team can bring.Said Reinfeld, “The 176 hours of extra coverage in October led to a number of contacts that occurred outside the normal hours before (the grant). Before, when outside hour contacts occurred, we’d call, we’d wait for a DCR to come out from wherever they lived to come to the scene, to get their things, so it could be an hour, hour and a half. The average response time in October was 7.8 minutes during covered hours.”DCRs are also important for hospitals as people in crisis potentially take up emergency beds while waiting for evaluation. In other cases, DCRs help by reducing the call load to emergency services.“Before we did field response here in town we would make 15 or 20 contacts with somebody in a month , sometimes 5 to 10 contacts a day. We were contacting the same person with a mental health crisis that didn’t reach involuntary treatment act criteria so we couldn’t take them to the hospital to get them examined/evaluated, maybe get them some help.” explained Reinfeld, “(Now) field response comes there, talks to them. They have access to those services, they get them enrolled in services, they get case management, and the call load drops to zero for that individual.”Captain Reinfeld also credited the newly refurbished Parkside mental health treatment facility in Wenatchee for improving mental health response in North Central Washington.last_img read more

Hitting the Brick Wall

first_imgby, Martin Bayne, ChangingAging ContributorTweetShareShareEmail0 SharesThe only thing worse than having to spend the remainder of your natural life in a Skilled Nursing Facility (SNF) of your choosing, is spending the remainder of your natural life in a Skilled Nursing Facility NOT of your choosing.Is there a difference?You betcha.When I need rehabilitation care (almost always provided in a SNF), as part of a healing and recovery phase after a stay in an acute care hospital, 99 out of 100 times I’m going to a SNF for a 3-5 week stay.Now here’s the caveat . . . You are ALWAYS in a better position strategically when YOU have the time and resources to choose the SNF, instead of the SNF choosing you.Example: After an acute hospital stay for a recent bout of pneumonia, I called my sister, a social worker with a strong background in local SNFs, and she came up with a list of SNFs ranked by a half-dozen criteria. Now, the next step . . . We APPLIED to each and every SNF on the Top Six List. This is a critical step. Why? Because Good SNFs are like good colleges. Admission is competitive and they’re expensive.That’s right, SNFs choose you. And like good colleges, they’re going to choose residents who have resources over those with limited or no resources. Why? Because a resident who can pay for their care from their own assets are always more attractive than residents who depend on Medicaid.What’s the message here?Make sure you have the resources to fund an SNF stay.And because most Americans do not have $2 million saved for an extended stay, the idea is to divert the massive financial liability onto an insurer. . . for pennies on the dollar.This, a simple way of saying, “Buy LTC insurance.”Today. While you’re still insurable.PS.   I was premature in my assessment of the Phoebe Ministries SNF. I admit to four days of crankiness following my pneumonia. They’re actually very responsive to my care needs and have a  good PT program. Sorry. Over 140 years old, Phoebe Ministries from 1926Related PostsTweetShareShareEmail0 SharesTags: long term care insurance Martin Bayne Short Term Rehab skilled nursing homelast_img read more

Bruker launches innovative iProbe HRMAS for biomolecular materials and clinical research

first_imgFalko Busse, Ph.D., President of the Bruker BioSpin Group, stated: Bruker is very committed to provide our scientific and industrial customers tools for maximum scientific productivity. The forward-thinking architecture behind the iProbe HRMAS concept allows basic research as well as applied science customers the efficient implementation of leading-edge HRMAS experiments, with even better performance, ease of use and stability.” Source: https://www.bruker.com/news/bruker-introduces-new-probe-technology-enabling-full-automation-in-high-resolution-mas-nmr-for-biomolecular-materials-and-clinical-research.html Jul 10 2018At EUROMAR 2018 conference (www.euromar2018.org), Bruker announced the iProbe™ HRMAS, which now enables full automation of high-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) NMR. Built on the recently introduced iProbe platform, the new HRMAS technology offers for the first time all benefits of automated tuning and matching for all RF-channels, together with accurate automated adjustment of the magic angle position. The automatic sample exchange capabilities of the iProbe HRMAS enable simplified sample handling and experiment optimization, leading to higher reproducibility and productivity in academic, industrial and clinical research. Bruker also presents other novel magnetic resonance based tools for chemistry, biomolecular and material science research at EUROMAR 2018: The Biosolids CryoProbe™ is the latest technology introduction of the high-sensitivity CryoProbe series. Biosolids CryoProbes now allow the investigation of various biological solids, such as membrane proteins or disease aggregates at physiological temperatures, with a three-fold boost in sensitivity. After the extremely successful adoption of cryogenically cooled NMR probes for liquids NMR and MR imaging, the Biosolids CryoProbe represents the 3rd frontier for this breakthrough technology. The probes, designed for standard-bore magnets, are compatible with the CryoPlatform™. They can reach magic angle spinning (MAS) rates of up to 20 kHz.Bruker’s line of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) NMR systems has now expanded to include a 263 GHz klystron microwave source for DNP NMR for materials research at 400 MHz, and a 593 GHz gyrotron microwave source for high-field 900 MHz DNP NMR for biological research. The 263 GHz klystron offers DNP at lower cost, and with reduced footprint and facility requirements. Bruker delivered the first 593 GHz DNP system in October 2017 to EPFL in Lausanne, Switzerland. Development included a new gyrotron tube design for 593 GHz, using a 11.7 T gyrotron magnet, custom microwave transmission line, and new 900 MHz low-temperature MAS DNP probes.center_img The compact AVANCE™ NEO NanoBay now extends the successful line of NEO consoles with dual-channel transmit & dual receive capabilities to routine 300 and 400 MHz NMR. With the novel NEO ‘transceiver’ architecture, each NMR channel in the AVANCE NEO is a functional spectrometer, thereby enabling a new generation of multi-receive experiments. The small footprint NanoBay supports a wide range of applications, including chemistry research and analysis, high-throughput screening for applied markets and quality control, and to structure verification in drug discovery.A novel 1.0 GHz NMR TXO CryoProbe™ now also permits 15N direct detection on GigaHertz NMR spectrometers. Prof. Haribabu Arthanari of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute at Harvard Medical School stated: New CryoProbes coupled with novel NMR methods that harness the slow relaxation advantages of low-gamma nuclei (15N & 13C) offer great promise for investigating even larger molecular weight proteins and IDPs by NMR. Acquiring high sensitivity 15N detection data on 1.0 GHz NMR is a great opportunity to further enable the investigation of critical interactions between transcription factors and the general transcriptional machinery, and to decipher the secrets of the disordered part of the human proteome sometimes referred to as the ‘Dark Proteome’.” Similar to liquid NMR, the new iProbe HRMAS provides automatic sample insertion and ejection from the top of the magnet. Automated tuning and matching is performed with the enhanced, 2nd generation ATMA using cartesian coordinates-based algorithms, while the adjustment of the magic angle outperforms the precision and reproducibility of manual optimization.In combination with Bruker’s sample changer line SamplePro™, and routine IconNMR™ acquisition software and TopSolids analysis software, HRMAS NMR spectroscopy now becomes suitable for applied markets, such as metabolic profiling of human tissues, as well as novice HRMAS users in research. The iProbe HRMAS is available for 400, 500 and 600 MHz standard bore magnets.last_img read more

Child psychiatrist available on call to help assess separated immigrant children

first_img Source:https://gumc.georgetown.edu/Georgetown-Physician-On-Call-to-Assess-Separated-Immigrant-Children Jul 20 2018Child psychiatrist Matthew Biel, MD, MSc, wasn’t at all surprised to learn from news reports in early July that two children separated at the US border from their Central American parents and sent to Connecticut were diagnosed, by a Yale University psychiatrist, with “full blown acute post traumatic stress disorder.” Biel, associate professor of clinical psychiatry and pediatrics at Georgetown University School of Medicine, worries that the symptoms exhibited by the children, ages 6 and 14, of depression, anxiety, sleeplessness and a lack of hope are likely common among the thousands of separated child detainees, and that the youngest of them may have significant and long-lasting impacts as a result of forced separation from their parents.”The longer the separation is, the worse it is, but an acute unexpected separation that a kid and the family can’t prepare for, even if it is for a few days, can be massively disruptive and have an effect that might last days, weeks, and months. A separation that lasts for months or longer may affect kids for years to come,” says Biel, who is also chief of adolescent and child psychiatry at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital. “It is absolutely terrifying from a public health standpoint to think about the numbers of kids experiencing sudden and prolonged separation,” he says. Biel, an expert in childhood development, trauma and resilience, co-leads the Early Childhood Innovation Network (ECIN) (with Lee Savio Beers, MD, of the Children’s National Health System). ECIN has been identified by the Alliance for the Advancement of Infant Mental Health to be a D.C. area expert on call for help in assessing separated immigrant children. Biel hopes that ECIN will be able to contribute to supporting impacted children and families.”I know that there are professional organizations all over the country who are pulling together responses and resource lists for every state, every city, so that experts in infant and early childhood developmental health can provide support,” he says. “There is a big response being mounted but this is a very significant number of kids.”ECIN is an alliance of health and education providers, community organizations, researchers, and advocates promoting resilience in families and children from pregnancy through age 5 in D.C. It seeks to prevent the damage to long-term health and development that exposure to poverty, trauma, and adverse childhood experiences can wreak in early childhood. Related StoriesSugary drinks linked to cancer finds studyWhy Mattresses Could be a Health Threat to Sleeping ChildrenNew research links “broken heart syndrome” to cancerThe network, which also partners with Georgetown University and MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, was launched in 2016 with a $6 million, five-year grant from the J. Willard and Alice S. Marriott Foundation. Biel says that a key mission of ECIN is to recognize the signs of “toxic stress” in children and families. Toxic stress describes chronic exposure to adversity in a child’s life -; everything from having a parent with a mental illness or addiction, living with domestic violence or neglect or in an unsafe neighborhood. “These are common experiences that exist all over the country, certainly in DC and in every neighborhood in DC, not just among low-income families,” Biel explains.Acute stress seen in family separation can become toxic stress if prolonged, but the two conditions share one dramatic element of risk -; separation from a parent or caregiver.”All kids, and particularly young children under five, need to be in the presence of consistent, capable, and familiar caregivers. Being separated from caregivers is fundamentally traumatic for young kids. It makes young kids feel in danger, confused, disoriented, unsafe, with an imperiled sense of security. That security is a prerequisite, a fundamental requirement for kids’ brains to develop optimally,” he says.Being abruptly separated from parents at the U.S./Mexican border, after an arduous journey, defines the epitome of mental health risk, Biel adds. “It is hard to conceive of a more noxious experience for kids under the age of five.”Trauma can be reversed, he says, but it is not easy. There are clinical strategies for helping families to reunite and re-establish security. But it is not automatic and it takes intensive psychological and social support to recover from intense experiences of loss of love and security.”last_img read more

Podcast KHNs What the Health See you in court

first_imgAug 17 2018A federal district court judge in Texas has set Sept. 10 as the date for oral arguments in a case filed by Republican state attorneys general and governors from 20 states. Their lawsuit charges that the Affordable Care Act should be found unconstitutional following Congress’ elimination of the tax penalty for failing to have insurance. That date is less than two months before the critical midterm election that will determine which party controls Congress.Meanwhile, a group of cities whose leaders support the health law have also filed suit. They charge that President Donald Trump has violated his constitutional duty to “take care” to “faithfully execute” laws passed by Congress in relation to the ACA. They say the damage done to the law by the Trump administration has raised health costs in their jurisdictions.Also in court this week were Medicaid recipients from Arkansas, who say the state’s new work requirements for healthy people getting such coverage threatens their health care.This week’s panelists for KHN’s “What the Health?” are Julie Rovner of Kaiser Health News, Alice Ollstein of Talking Points Memo, Margot Sanger-Katz of The New York Times and Kimberly Leonard of the Washington Examiner.Among the takeaways from this week’s podcast: This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente. Related StoriesPDFNJ campaign emphasizes the hazards of prescription opioidsConcurrent use of benzodiazepine and opioids complicates neonatal abstinence syndromeOpioids alone cannot be blamed for growing life expectancy inequality in the U.S.Plus, for “extra credit,” the panelists recommend their favorite health stories of the week they think you should read, too:Julie Rovner: The Washington Examiner’s “Hospitals Present a Major Roadblock to Medicare for All Act,” by Kimberly LeonardAlso, Rovner mentioned a 2009 story: The New Yorker’s “Getting There From Here” by Atul GawandeMargot Sanger-Katz: Kaiser Family Foundation’s “An Analysis Of Out-Of-Network Claims In Large Employer Health Plans,” by Gary Claxton, Matthew Rae, Cynthia Cox and Larry LevittAlice Ollstein: STAT News’ “Tapered To Zero: In Radical Move, Oregon’s Medicaid Program Weighs Cutting Off Chronic Pain Patients From Opioids,” by Lev FacherKimberly Leonard: Pew Stateline’s “For Addicted Women, the Year After Childbirth Is The Deadliest,” by Christine VestalTo hear all our podcasts, click here.And subscribe to What the Health? on iTunes, Stitcher or Google Play.center_img The timing of the arguments in the attorneys general’s ACA case — and the possibility of a quick decision — could remind midterm voters that the GOP is still vowing to get rid of the law. On the other hand, some Republicans are hoping that the case will help fire up the base, which in the past has responded well to the party’s criticisms of the law. The attorneys general in Missouri and West Virginia are among those bringing the suit — and they are also challenging incumbent Senate Democrats. Their political futures could be closely tied to the suit. As Arkansas’ work requirements move to a court case, the state announced that thousands of people are in danger of losing coverage because they did not report their work hours online, as required. Despite the administration’s strong opposition to the ACA, officials are divided over whether to allow states to accept only a partial expansion of Medicaid under the law. That would save money for the states — who shoulder part of the cost of Medicaid — but likely would cost the federal government more because many people who ordinarily would qualify for Medicaid would instead move to the health insurance marketplace and get federal subsidies. Hospitals are watching with concern the Democratic debate over setting up a national, single-payer health system. Savings that the Democrats expect from such a move would likely have to come from hospitals’ and doctors’ revenues.last_img read more

Dissections banned in Indian universities

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) BANGALORE, INDIA—A long campaign to persuade Indian authorities to bar dissections in university classes has achieved a major victory. The University Grants Commission (UGC), a governmental body that sets standards for university education in India, has banned the dissection of animals in zoology and life science university courses. Some educators decry the decision, arguing that classrooms aren’t prepared to offer alternatives to dissections.The animal rights advocacy group People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) has been calling for a ban for several years, arguing that computer models and simulations can effectively replace dissection. In 2011, UGC issued guidelines that exempted students from performing dissections in undergraduate classes and allowed students in postgraduate courses to opt out. In March, the Medical Council of India imposed a ban on animal dissection in undergraduate medical courses as well and is considering extending the ban to postgraduate courses.Most zoology students do not use the knowledge gained from dissections after they graduate, argues Chaitanya Koduri, science policy adviser to PETA India. “When you don’t need to use animals in the first place, why kill them?” According to Koduri, several frog species have become endangered in the past 40 years because zoology students across India have collected them in large numbers for experiments. Dissection indeed is a major pressure on frog populations, says N. A. Aravind, an ecologist who studies mollusks at the Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment here. He cites the Indian bullfrog, which was slaughtered for its meat and also used widely in dissections until 1991, when it was listed as an endangered species under the Indian Wildlife Protection Act. Although illegal hunting continues, the frog’s populations appear to have stabilized. Although acknowledging that threatened species shouldn’t be used for dissection, Kambadur Muralidhar, a professor of endocrinology at South Asian University in New Delhi, says that substituting species in dissections—for example, using the common walking catfish instead of endangered Scoliodon fish—would have addressed the issue. Muralidhar, who earlier headed UGC’s curriculum development committee for zoology, says that extensive talks were held with PETA and the Animal Welfare Board of India to arrive at a compromise “under which you don’t dissect unnecessarily. But it looks like UGC hasn’t listened.”Although PETA has suggested the use of computer-simulated dissections, scientists say that simulators are not yet widely available in Indian universities. “Hardly any colleges have them as of now,” says Narendra Saini, secretary general of the Indian Medical Association. He adds that even if simulations are used widely, a limited number of dissections would be indispensable for education in the life sciences. Emailcenter_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwelast_img read more

Feature Testing Einsteins theory in the galaxys toughest neighborhood

first_imgEinstein’s general theory of relativity turns 100 this year! Find out more in a special issue from Science. Searching for the ultimate test of general relativity, researchers are looking toward the center of our galaxy. There, shrouded in dust, lurks a bright, compact source of radio waves known as Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*). Astronomers think that Sgr A* marks the dark heart of the Milky Way: a supermassive black hole weighing as much as 4 million suns. That black hole produces the most intense gravitational field in our galaxy and so provides a unique laboratory for testing the predictions of general relativity. Over the next few years, using a range of new instruments, astronomers are hoping to see whether Sgr A* is bending relativity beyond breaking point.last_img

Japan still mulling lethal research whaling

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Japan devised a New Scientific Whale Research Program in the Antarctic Ocean in response to a March 2014 ruling by the International Court of Justice that the previous research whaling effort did not comply with the International Convention for the Regulation of Whaling. Following standard procedure, the new plan was studied by an expert committee earlier this year, and then taken up by IWC’s Scientific Committee at its annual meeting in San Diego, California, last month. Following precedent, the committee’s report summarizes opinions opposing and supporting the plan. A group of 44 scientists from 18 countries signed a statement appended to the report saying there was no justification for killing whales for research. At today’s press conference, Morishita claimed that there are a number of scientists who agree that the research program should be restarted. Opponents and advocates of scientific whaling have been at loggerheads for decades. Many scientists against killing whales for research also oppose the resumption of commercial whaling. Meanwhile, Japan and a handful of other countries, including Norway and Iceland, consider whales a marine resource that can be harvested sustainably. “It’s hard if not impossible to see a way out” of the impasse, Morishita said.*Correction, 25 June, 10:37 a.m.: The story was updated to include that 44 scientists from 18 countries signed a statement appended to the report. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Email TOKYO—Japan has not yet decided if it will resume killing whales as part of its Antarctic research whaling program, but the country believes it has the right to do so, Joji Morishita, the nation’s representative to the International Whaling Commission (IWC), said here today.Addressing the press 3 days after IWC’s Scientific Committee issued a report stating that opinion is split on whether taking whales for research is justified, Morishita said that Japan will endeavor to address a number of pending scientific questions before resuming the program. But he stressed that under international law, the Scientific Committee “does not have jurisdiction to approve or deny the research plan.”last_img read more

Duck bills sensitive touch develops in the egg

first_img By Roni DenglerNov. 6, 2017 , 3:00 PM iStock.com/Rinelle Duck bill’s sensitive touch develops in the eggcenter_img The bills of even newly hatched ducks might be as sensitive as our hands, as touch sensors in their beaks are as abundant as those in our fingertips and palms. That’s the takeaway of new research published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that describes the origins of touchiness in the common duck’s quacker. Researchers knew that duck bills can sense light touch but have muted responsiveness to temperature. This comes in handy (or bill-y) since the birds forage for food in cold, murky bottom waters. Now, researchers find the sensors duck bills use to perceive touch work even before hatching. That likely helps young ducklings scavenge for food alongside adults soon after birth. In keeping with the need to feel for food, the ducks have more nerve cells to relay touch signals than chickens, which rely on eyesight to find sustenance, they report. That means different developmental programs are at work in ducks and chickens, which could help scientists uncover how touch evolved. Because the duck’s touch sensors are similar to mammals’ and their bills aren’t covered in fur, the authors suggest embryonic duck bills might be a better model than standard laboratory rodents to study touch sensation as it applies to us relatively hairless humans.last_img read more

Mosquitoes may be contaminating ecosystems with tiny bits of plastic

first_imgPaul Starosta/Getty Images Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country By Erica TennenhouseSep. 18, 2018 , 7:01 PM Mosquitoes may be contaminating ecosystems with tiny bits of plastic Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe The findings, reported today in Biology Letters, indicate that after adult mosquitoes abandon the water (as shown in the image above), they can introduce the bits of plastic they ate as larvae into their new habitats. That means when nonaquatic predators—including birds, bats, and dragonflies—snack on mosquitoes, they may be in for an unhealthy dose of microplastics from the polluted waters in which their prey were born. Scientists already know microplastics can be toxic to many underwater animals. This newly discovered transport route may pose a threat to insect-eating species on land as well. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Mosquito larvae are remarkably unfussy eaters. They glide through the ponds and puddles they live in, creating currents that draw tiny particles of food into their mouths—but miniscule plastic morsels can easily slip down the hatch as well. New research shows these “microplastics” stick around in the mosquitoes’ bellies even after they emerge from the water as flying adults, putting their land predators in danger of ingesting the contaminants.To conduct the study, researchers poured small fluorescent yellow and green plastic beads about the size of red blood cells into water-filled beakers containing hungry mosquito larvae. Several days later, they fished the larvae out.When the larvae grew up, the team spotted glowing beads inside their Malpighian tubules—structures equivalent to kidneys—confirming that microplastics can linger in an insect’s body even as it shifts from its larval to adult life stage. The researchers also found that the smaller the beads were, the more likely they were to wind up in the mosquitoes.last_img read more

Marrying two types of solar cells draws more power from the sun

first_img By Robert F. ServiceApr. 10, 2019 , 4:30 PM V. Altounian/Science A perfect match A new tandem solar cell design uses a perovskite layer (pink), which absorbs energy from blue and purple photons and re-emits it as near-infrared (near-IR) photons. Along with other colors of light, these photons are absorbed by a silicon (gray) solar cell and converted to electricity. Marrying two types of solar cells draws more power from the sun ORLANDO, FLORIDA—The promising solar cell materials called perovskites need a partner. Researchers marry a layer of perovskite, which absorbs high-energy blue photons in sunlight, with standard silicon, which gobbles up lower-energy light. In theory, such tandem cells should deliver a double dose of power, with electricity coming from both layers. But building two complete solar cells, one atop the other, adds cost and other challenges. Last week, a team reported advancing a potentially simpler, cheaper way to make a tandem.The team’s perovskite converts light instead of generating current, transforming blue photons to near-infrared (near-IR) photons, which the silicon cell below then turns into electricity. The researchers say the design could boost the efficiency of silicon solar cells by nearly 20%. If it does, it could be key to realizing the promise of perovskites, a class of compounds that share a crystal structure and are made from common elements such as lead, bromine, and chlorine.”This is one of the most exciting results I’ve seen in a long time,” says Michael McGehee, a perovskite expert at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California. “The boost in efficiency they are claiming is very significant.” Silicon solar cell–makers, a $30 billion a year industry in 2016, grasp at every tenth of a percentage point gain in efficiency. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Silicon dominates the solar industry not because it’s the best solar converter, but because it’s serviceable and relatively cheap. Still, manufacturers must use expensive clean rooms to purify and prepare it. Perovskites, in contrast, are easy to coax into a thin, powerfully light-absorbing layer. Most perovskites are best at absorbing blue light, so they must be paired with other materials to snag the full solar spectrum.The solar industry is racing to commercialize perovskites by placing them atop conventional silicon modules, which discard much of the energy in bluer light photons, releasing it as heat rather than electric current. But in addition to the expense of adding device layers, manufacturers must also grapple with practical challenges such as designing tandems so the amount of current coming out of each cell is the same. If they don’t, the overall current is limited by the weaker of the two cells. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Silicon solar cells could get a boost in electrical output with a coating of perovskite materials. In this perovskite’s arrangementof atoms, ytterbium atoms (yellow)work with a vacant site (white) toconvert blue light to near-IR.PerovskiteSiliconElectrodeLightNear-IR photons Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Electricity flows out Lena Ason/Alamy Stock Photo Two years ago, researchers led by electrical engineer Hongwei Song at Jilin University in Changchun, China, reported a way around these challenges. By sprinkling a small amount of the rare earth metal ytterbium into a standard cesium- and lead-based perovskite, they found they could build a perovskite tandem with a different, simpler architecture. Like conventional perovskites, the ytterbium-doped version absorbs blue photons, energizing electrons in the material. But these electrons aren’t turned into current. Instead, they immediately pass their energy to the ytterbium atoms, which re-emit virtually all of it as near-IR light. Most of these photons zip into the silicon cell below, which absorbs nearly all their energy and efficiently converts it to electricity, losing very little as heat. “For solar energy conversion, this combination of materials is almost exactly what you want,” says Daniel Gamelin, a chemist at the University of Washington in Seattle.The perovskites Song’s team created were nanoparticles, however, which are hard to lay down uniformly on a silicon cell. The challenge is acute with the best-performing commercial cells, in which silicon is topped with a protective layer of glass that is intentionally roughened. The miniature glass mountains help light enter the cell instead of reflecting off its top surface, but the perovskite nanoparticles don’t always form an even layer on the rough surface.At last week’s American Chemical Society meeting here, Gamelin reported that he and his colleagues have solved this problem. They used a common solar cell–growing technique known as vacuum deposition to create thin, smooth layers of ytterbium-doped perovskite on roughly 14-centimeter silicon solar cells. The technique coats the miniature glass mountain range with an even perovskite film.In the resulting tandem, nearly all the blue light absorbed by the perovskite is converted to near-IR photons, Gamelin reported. As a result, he predicts, topping a high-end silicon cell with the ytterbium perovskite should enable it to convert 32.2% of the energy it absorbs as sunlight into electricity, up from 27%—a 19.2% boost. Gamelin’s team is doing experiments now to confirm those predictions. “I am a little skeptical of the numbers,” McGehee says. But even a fraction of that increase “would be a big deal,” he says.Michael Graetzel, a photovoltaic expert at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, agrees. But he says practical concerns such as emitted near-IR photons escaping may limit gains to less than 10%.Last month, Gamelin and his colleagues launched a startup, BlueDot, to commercialize the technology. They have plenty of competition. Perovskite startups such as Oxford PV in the United Kingdom and Saule Technologies in Warsaw are already field testing their perovskite-silicon tandems or preparing to do so. But BlueDot hopes to leapfrog the other companies, because its simpler tandem design should enable standard silicon solar cell manufacturers to integrate perovskites into their manufacturing lines more easily—and get perovskites onto the roofs of the world.last_img read more

Ohio KKK Rally Expected To Be Next Charlottesville

first_img Black Lives Matter , Black Lives Matter Dayton , KKK Rally Morehouse Students Take To Social Media And Claim Sexual Harassment Complaints Were Ignored How is a KKK rally even still a thing, let alone happening right here in downtown Dayton, in 2019? I’m genuinely heartbroken and disgusted for every human being that this horrible group believes is inferior to them & how they must be feeling right now. What a sad, sad time.— allie gorby (@allllliie) May 23, 2019Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, a Democrat, urged residents to avoid the area where the rally was scheduled to be held as she expected there to be a clash between the KKK group and counter-protesters. Several town halls and events, some of them hosted by the Dayton chapter of the NAACP, have been held throughout the city to prepare residents for the “powder keg,” as one local rabbi called it.“Courthouse Square will be a powder keg on the 25th,” Rabbi Ari Ballaban wrote in a statement. “Not only will the KKK be present, but there will likely be thousands of angry counter-protestors there, many bused in from around the region. I trust our local police to ensure Dayton not become the next Charlottesville, but I still wouldn’t recommend someone I loved place themselves in such a situation.” For anyone in Dayton wanting to respond to the KKK Rally this weekend, I urge you to check out these events headed by the Dayton NAACP. Promote love not hate. pic.twitter.com/QZcHLBZnQr— Sherri Goudy (@wsusherri07) May 21, 2019 Twitter Mocks White Supremacists Struggling To Flee Philadelphia After A Rally “The City Commission and I hope that May 25 can be remembered not as a day of hatred and bigotry, but as a day that our community demonstrated that we are united against hate,” Whaley said.SEE ALSO:Ring The Alarm! Dionne Warwick Says Beyoncé Isn’t An Icon And The Beyhive Has A Hissy Fit ‘Study’ Conducted By White People Claims Trump Has Made White People Less Racist “Our Black community is facing astronomical levels of systemic racism and the launch of Black Lives Matter Dayton would like to be that bridge of hope for Black citizens by focusing on challenging laws and policies that keep Black people and communities oppressed and terrorized by police brutality,” Buford wrote on the group’s GoFundMe page.Black Lives Matter Dayton applied to host a counter event nearby and on the same day and time as the KKK rally, but it was denied after venue management talked to city and police officials. Yet openly racist white people with weapons were apparently readily granted permission to rally just two blocks away.The KKK rally was slated to take place at Dayton’s Courthouse Square, which is owned by Montgomery County. Ten to 20 people wearing masks or bandannas were expected to participate in the rally. The city has been on edge about the Saturday’s event since the KKK’s permit was approved in February. City officials attempted to sue the group in March to prevent the rally claiming the Knights violated Ohio law by holding a military-style rally and pointed out the fact that the group intended to bring weapons.center_img Again, there is a terrorist group invading my city in two weeks and you remain silent about it. You are NOT for the safety and security of your constituents. Rob Portman is definitely pro KKK!— Nathan from Dayton (@dayton_from) May 14, 2019 White Tears! Former Meteorologist Files Lawsuit Claiming He Was Fired Because Of Diversity More By Megan Sims Jamaican Republican Who Is Running Against AOC Supported Her A Year Ago Philadelphians Rally Strong Against Far Right Extremists Groups Rallying With racial tensions rising across the country at a fever pitch, one racist group’s hateful plans to hold a white nationalist rally in Ohio was being threatened by a new Black Lives Matter chapter.Black Lives Matter Dayton was expected to launch on Saturday, the same day a so-called Honorable Sacred Knights rally was scheduled to take place in Dayton. The hate group is affiliated with the Ku Klux Klan in Indiana. Black Lives Matter Dayton organizer Carlos Buford explained what it was hoping to accomplish Saturday and beyond.last_img read more

Will Illinois Legal Weed Law Exclude Black People

first_img The Blackest Reactions To The First Democratic Debate Morehouse Students Take To Social Media And Claim Sexual Harassment Complaints Were Ignored SUBSCRIBE Entertainment, News and Lifestyle for Black America. News told by us for us. Black America’s #1 News Source: Our News. Our Voice. Jamaican Republican Who Is Running Against AOC Supported Her A Year Ago More By Megan Sims Thanks for signing up! Get ready for Exclusive content, Interviews,and Breaking news delivered direct to your inbox. Get ready for Exclusive content, Interviews,and Breaking news delivered direct to your inbox. Illinois is not an isolated case as Black people all over the country face huge hurdles when it comes to being able to participate in the thriving legal marijuana industry. According to Vice, costs to sell weed legally can go up to $120,000, which does not include legal fees, insurance, space rental, marketing, and taxes. Expenses can easily balloon into millions of dollars. Forbes reported that minority business owners are less likely to be approved for business loans and when they are approved they receive lower amounts and higher interest rates.Vice also noted that the wealth gap has also contributed to the lack of Black people represented in the cannabis industry with white families making 10 times more than the net worth of Black families.Though Illinois’ new bill plans to designate a certain amount of licenses for minorities looking to become involved in the business, the law still does not seem to address the factors that will make it compete with established dispensaries. Dan Pettigrew, who runs the largest Black-owned marijuana dispensary in the country out of Denver, expressed fears that these dispensaries will dominate the whole industry in Illinois.“That’s a pretty big giveaway to the industry, giving them a serious, significant head start, and potentially a monopoly,” he said.SEE ALSO:R. Kelly’s Alleged Sex Tape Is Now In The Possession Of His LawyersBlack Women Play Major Role In First Democratic Debate Without Them Actually Being There According to The Chicago Sun Times, the bill is also supposed to create a Restore, Reinvest and Renew program that would give 25 percent of cannabis revenue to disproportionately impacted by divestment. And when it comes to dispensaries, sponsors claimed this legislation would help minority community become involved in the business.“With this legislation, our state once again is a leader, putting forward the most equity-centric cannabis legalization in the nation,” Pritzker said.Though many have agreed that the new bill is very progressive, potential Black cannabis entrepreneurs said they still believe they have not been getting heard. Illinois has 20 marijuana cultivators and 50 medical dispensaries where there is a lack of minority ownership. Under the new law, they will have first dibs on the marijuana licenses to have the chance to operate as a dual dispensary. The state does not plan on distributing licenses for new cultivators until July 2021, which has some potential Black entrepreneurs afraid that by the time they even begin, there will be no room for them.“These guys are going to snatch up all potential sites that could be critical, especially in minority neighborhoods,” Donte Townsend, who is president of the Chicago chapter of the National Organization, said prior to the signing of the new bill. “A lot of these neighborhoods that have the potential of being gentrified are going to be flooded with dispensaries and then when it comes time for other applicants, specifically the social equity applicants, to look for a location or get started, they won’t have anywhere to go.” With the nation slowly but surely changing how it views marijuana usage and its distribution, many states have passed laws to legalize and or decriminalize cannabis. With another yet another state passing marijuana legislation, things seem to be looking up for those looking to profit from cannabis, but Black entrepreneurs are not too sure.Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker on Tuesday signed a bill legalizing the recreational use of marijuana and making the state the 11th in the country to sign weed legislation. The bill makes it legal for residents 21 and over to possess 30 grams of marijuana and 500 milligrams of THC infused products. The state also took the important step of decriminalizing weed as well with the bill creating automatic expunge records for those who had been arrested for possessing 30 grams. Illinois , legal marijuana , Legalization of Marijuana , recreational marijuana Democratic Presidential Candidates Participate In First Debate Of 2020 Election Over Two Nights White Tears! Former Meteorologist Files Lawsuit Claiming He Was Fired Because Of Diversitylast_img read more

Podcast cellphone sensors that assess earthquake damage and cutting the ancient Tibetan

first_img In the wake of a devastating earthquake, assessing the extent of damage to infrastructure is time consuming—now, a cheap sensor system based on the accelerometers in cellphones could expedite this process. Host Sarah Crespi talks with Contributing Correspondent Lizzie Wade about how these sensor systems work and how they might assist communities after an earthquake.In another Earth-shaking study, scientists have downgraded the height of the ancient Tibetan Plateau. Most reconstructions estimate that the “rooftop of the world” reached its current height of 4500 meters about 40 million years ago, but a new study suggests it was a mere 3000 meters high during this period. Host Meagan Cantwell speaks with Svetlana Botsyun, a postdoctoral researcher at Tübingen University in Germany, about her team’s new approach to studying paleoelevation, and how a shorter Tibetan Plateau would have impacted the surrounding area’s climate.This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.Download the transcript (PDF)Listen to previous podcasts.About the Science Podcast[Image: Martin Luff/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook] Martin Luff/Flickr last_img read more

Winslow Council to consider an increase in wastewater rate

first_imgWinslow Council to consider an increase in wastewater rate By L. Parsons         Last month, the Winslow City Council voted to table a discussion on raising wastewater user rates. The action, according to Winslow City Manager, Steve Pauken caused the city to have toSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Ad October 15, 2018last_img

Mayor calls for policy change in land sales

first_imgMayor calls for policy change in land sales February 1, 2019 By L. Parsons         WINSLOW — Winslow business owners, Gene Hancock and Andrew Payne, of Payne & Payne Enterprises purchased 10 acres of city owned property last week located near the intersection of North RoadSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Adlast_img

2005 Tumakuru Maoist attack Varavara Rao remanded in 2day judicial custody

first_img Varavara Rao, P Varavara Rao, 2005 naxal attack case, varavara rao maoist sympathiser, Elgaar Parishad case, Elgaar parishad, indian express On October 25, the Hyderabad High Court had extended Varavara Rao’s house arrest by three weeks.Telugu poet, activist and alleged Maoist sympathiser Varavara Rao was remanded in judicial custody on Thursday. 0 Comment(s) Related News Elgaar Parishad case: Varavara Rao in custody as house arrest ends Elgaar Parishad case: Activist Varavara Rao sent to police custody till November 26 Advertising Advertising The chargesheet stated that the attack was instigated by Rao and Telugu balladeer Gaddar.The Tumakuru police initially brought only 19 of the 61 accused to trial, while 42 others, including Rao and Gaddar, were not chargesheeted. All the 19 accused brought to trial were acquitted by a Tumakuru sessions court on October 29, 2011. In the course of a recent hearing of an appeal filed in 2012 by the Karnataka police against the trial court’s decision, a division bench of the Karnataka High Court in June sought action against those not brought to trial.The police on June 11 filed a chargesheet against the remaining 42 persons. Elgaar Parishad case: Varavara Rao’s house arrest ends, Pune City Police takes him into custody The 78-year-old was taken into custody by the Karnataka police from Pune’s Yerwada jail after he was named among 42 persons not brought to trial in connection with a 2005 Maoist attack on a Karnataka police unit in the Tumakuru region that had left eight people dead.Rao, who was brought from Pune on a transit warrant issued on Wednesday, was produced before a magistrate’s court in Tumakuru and was remanded in prison for two days.He had been named by police as being among 61 Maoists and their sympathisers linked to an attack on a Karnataka State Reserve Police unit at Venkatamanahalli village, on the Karnataka-Andhra Pradesh border. By Express News Service |Bengaluru | Published: July 5, 2019 2:39:00 amlast_img read more

Podcast exploding the Cambrian and building a DNA database for forensics

first_img(PHOTO) JOHN LEHMANN; (FOSSIL) ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM First, we hear from science writer Joshua Sokol about his trip to the Cambrian—well not quite. He talks with host Megan Cantwell about his travels to a remote site in the mountains of British Columbia where some of Earth’s first animals—including a mysterious, alien-looking creature—are spilling out of Canadian rocks.  Also on this week’s show, host Sarah Crespi talks with James Hazel a postdoctoral research fellow at the Center for Genetic Privacy and Identity in Community Settings at Vanderbilt University in Nashville about a proposal for creating a universal forensic DNA database. He and his co-authors argue that current, invasive practices such as law enforcement subpoenaing medical records, commercial genetic profiles, and other sets of extremely detailed genetic information during criminal investigations, would be curtailed if a forensics-use-only universal database were created.    This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.  Read a transcript (PDF)Listen to previous podcasts.  About the Science Podcastlast_img read more

Bihar flood toll rises to 67 48 lakh affected

first_img Rajiv Pratap Rudy targets tourism ministry for no move on projects in Bihar The highest number of casualties were reported from Sitamarhi with 17 deaths, followed by Araria (12), Madhubani (11), Sheohar (9), Purnea (7) Darbhanga (5), Kishanganj (4) and Supaul (2).A total of 831 panchayats in 92 blocks were affected by flash floods caused by additional water discharge from Nepal.Pratyaya Amrit, Principal Secretary of the Disaster Management Department, said, “About 1.15 lakh people have been living in relief camps. We are also running 1,116 community kitchens in flood-affected areas. Twenty-six teams of NDRF and SDRF have been in operation”. Two labourers die of asphyxiation while cleaning well in Bihar Related News Bihar Chief Minister Nitish Kumar had on Tuesday said that the government would compensate people for loss of crops and livestock. The CM had conducted aerial surveys of flood-affected areas on three days. He said while flash floods had inundated some parts of Bihar, several other districts might face drought because of inadequate rains.The Opposition RJD, however, said that flood relief and rescue operations need to be scaled up. RJD spokesperson Bhai Birendra told The Indian Express, “What the government announced in the Assembly has not reached the ground. Twenty-six teams of NDRF and SDRF are grossly inadequate when over 48 lakh people are affected by floods. Thousands of people have not got basic food items like rice and jaggery. All the government’s claims are on paper.”RJD leader and former CM Rabri Devi urged Prime Minister Narendra Modi to declare the floods as a national disaster. Bihar floods, Bihar floods death toll, Bihar floods news, bihar rains, bihar weather today, bihar monsoon, flash flood bihar, Nitish kumar, Indian express A flooded village, following incessant rainfall, in Bihar’s Muzaffarpur district on Wednesday. (PTI)The toll in the Bihar floods rose to 67 on Wednesday with over 48 lakh people being affected in 12 districts across the state. Post Comment(s) By Express News Service |Patna | Published: July 18, 2019 3:09:24 am Advertising Advertising Heavy rain in Nepal leads to flood in several Bihar districts last_img read more

NorthShore and Ambry announce launch of new test to assess prostate cancer

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Sep 26 2018NorthShore University HealthSystem’s (NorthShore) Center for Personalized Medicine and Ambry Genetics Corporation (Ambry), announced today the launch of AmbryScore for prostate cancer risk.AmbryScore is the first commercially available polygenic risk score designed to estimate a man’s individualized risk for prostate cancer. The test provides a prostate cancer risk assessment calculation based on the combined effects of 72-prostate cancer-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Knowing an individual’s prostate cancer risk allows for earlier intervention through screening, preventative, and diagnostic measures aimed at early detection, which has been shown to improve patient outcomes.The American Cancer Society estimates in 2018 there will be nearly 165,000 new cases of prostate cancer diagnosed and 30,000 deaths from the disease, indicating the need for better tools to aid in early intervention.The test is ordered through an individual’s healthcare provider, where a sample is collected with the option to select the test as an add-on to select hereditary cancer panels. Due to the population-specific nature of SNPs, a patient must be of Northern European ancestry to be eligible for the test.Originally developed by NorthShore researcher Jianfeng Xu, DrPH, the test is designed to provide physicians, including urologists, with a quantitative tool to better recognize the risk of prostate cancer. The test was validated in research conducted by William Isaacs, Ph.D., professor of urology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and will be published at the American Society Human Genetics Annual Meeting this October.”Implementing the test into our practice helps us understand and identify risk, which ultimately will help our patients as well as their families who may be at risk,” said Brian Helfand, MD, PhD, a urologist with NorthShore’s Center for Personalized Medicine, one of the most comprehensive personalized medicine programs in the country spanning genetic testing, counseling, and clinical prevention and treatment planning. “The test is truly life-changing for patients and their family members, who now have an opportunity to take control of their health by choosing to screen for select gene mutations and variations well before traditional diagnostic testing could offer actionable results,” added Helfand.Related StoriesTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerNew research links “broken heart syndrome” to cancerSugary drinks linked to cancer finds studyNorthShore and Ambry announced in September 2017 that they would collaborate to focus on bringing to market genetic tests aimed at saving lives and improving patients’ health. Previously, they also jointly announced the release of AmbryScore for breast cancer in 2018. AmbryScore for breast cancer combines clinical and family history information with 100 breast-cancer associated SNPs to provide a remaining lifetime breast cancer risk estimate to health care providers for eligible women who pursue multigene panel tests.”We are excited about our continued collaboration with NorthShore,” stated Brigette Tippin Davis Ph.D., FACMG, Sr. Vice President, Ambry Genetics. “Through clinical partnerships like this, we can bring innovative tests to patients and better understand disease outcomes related to genetics. After launching AmbryScore for breast cancer in March of 2018, we are especially pleased to now offer this test for prostate cancer.”​ Source:https://www.northshore.org/last_img read more